Examples Of Appendices In Essays What Do You Do To Book

Tables, Appendices, Footnotes and Endnotes

Summary:

Written for undergraduate students and new graduate students in psychology (experimental), this handout provides information on writing in psychology and on experimental report and experimental article writing.

Contributors:Dana Lynn Driscoll, Aleksandra Kasztalska
Last Edited: 2013-03-12 08:39:20

Appendices: When appendices might be necessary

Appendices allow you to include detailed information in your paper that would be distracting in the main body of the paper. Examples of items you might have in an appendix include mathematical proofs, lists of words, the questionnaire used in the research, a detailed description of an apparatus used in the research, etc.

Format of appendices

Your paper may have more than one appendix. Usually, each distinct item has its own appendix. If your paper only has one appendix, label it "Appendix" (without quotes.) If there is more than one appendix, label them "Appendix A," "Appendix B," etc. (without quotes) in the order that each item appears in the paper. In the main text, you should refer to the Appendices by their labels.

The actual format of the appendix will vary depending on the content; therefore, there is no single format. In general, the content of an appendix should conform to the appropriate APA style rules for formatting text.

Footnotes and Endnotes: When footnotes/endnotes might be necessary

Because APA style uses parenthetical citations, you do not need to use footnotes or endnotes to cite your sources. The only reasons you need to use footnotes are for explanatory (content) notes or copyright permission. Content footnotes contain information that supplements the text, but would be distracting or inappropriate to include in the body of the paper. In other words, content footnotes provide important information that is a tangent to what you are discussing in your paper.

The footnote should only express one idea. If it is longer than a few sentences, then you should consider putting this information in an appendix. Most authors do not use footnotes because they tend to be distracting to the readers. If the information is important, authors find a way to incorporate it into the text itself or put it in an appendix.

If you are including a quote that is longer than 500 words or a table or figure in your paper that was originally published elsewhere, then you need to include a footnote that acknowledges that you have permission from the owner of the copyright to use the material.

See our APA guidelines on Footnotes and Endnotes for more information.

When to use tables

Tables enable you to show your data in an easy to read format. However, you do not need to present all of your data in tabular form. Tables are only necessary for large amounts of data that would be too complicated in the text. If you only need to present a few numbers, you should do so directly in the text, not in a table.

How to use tables

Each table should be identified by a number, in the order that they appear in the text (e.g., Table 1, Table 2, etc.). When using a table, you need to refer to the table in the text (e.g., "As shown in Table 1,…") and point out to the reader what they should be looking for in the table. Do not discuss every piece of data that is in the table or else there is no point in having the table. Only mention the most important pieces of information from the table.

The table should also make sense on its own. Be sure to explain all abbreviations except standard abbreviations such as M, SD, and df. Don’t forget to identify the unit of measurement.

APA style has a specific format for tables. Tables should appear at the end of your paper, after the reference list and before any appendixes. Every table needs a unique title after its label. The title should be brief but clearly explain what is in the table.

How do I create an APPENDIX in APA style?

 


What is an appendix?

  • A section at the end of a paper that includes information that is too detailed for the text of the paper itself and would "burden the reader" or be "distracting," or "inappropriate" (APA, 2010, p. 38-9).
  • The content in the appendices should be "easily presented in print format" (APA, 2010, p. 39).
    • Examples:
      • lists of length (short lists belong in the paper itself)
      • detailed descriptions (essential details should be in the paper itself)
      • a list of articles that support data but are not referred to in the paper itself
      • demographic details for subpopulations studied by the paper

 


 

Where does the Appendix appear in the paper?

  • The appendices section, if there is one, is close to the last section of your APA-style paper:
    • title page
    • abstract
    • text of paper
    • references list
    • tables 
    • figures
    • appendices
    • footnotes (APA, 2010, p. 229-230). (Rarely used)

 


 

How to format an appendix:

  • You may have more than one appendix (aka appendices)
  • Each appendix should deal with a separate topic
  • Each appendix must be referred to by name (Appendix A, Appendix B, Appendix C, etc.) in the text of the paper
    • To refer to the Appendix within your text, write, (see Appendix A) at the end of the sentence in parentheses. Example:
      • In addition to the limitations of email, Cummings et al. (2002) reviewed studies that focused on international bank employees and college students (see Appendix B for demographic information).
  • Each appendix must be labeled with a letter (A, B, C, etc.) according to where it appears in the paper.
      • The first appendix referred to in the paper would be named Appendix A
      • The second appendix referred to in the paper would be named Appendix B
      • If you have more than 26 appendices, start the alphabet over with AA, BB, CC, and so on.
      • If there is only one appendix, it is just called Appendix
  • Each appendix must also have a title
  • Begin each appendix on a separate page
  • Place the label and title of each appendix at the top of the page, centered, using normal capitalization. Label first, title second.
  • Paragraphs
    • The first paragraph is flush left and not indented.
    • The second and following paragraphs are indented as "normal" paragraphs are.
    • All paragraphs are double spaced.
  • If your appendices include tables or figures, treat them as they would be treated in the main text.
    • See the Abstracts and Appendices page of the APA Guide for more information.
    • Exception to the tables/figures numbering rule: add the letter of the appendix (A, B, C, etc.) to the figure or table number (e.g., Table B3 would be the third table in Appendix B).
  • If your appendices use information from an outside source, cite it parenthetically within the text of the appendix and include the reference in the main references list for the paper (do not create a separate references list).

 


 

A sample appendix is below.

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